Posts Tagged ‘Grandmothers and Grandfathers’

Of Time and some Statistics of Old America

June 29, 2016

This may look like a bit of side tracking in my series of Posts on Time but it is not.  It fits in with the topic that I have in mind and it came at a time that is appropriate on this day before we leave June of 2016.

My friend Iowa Jim passed it on in email; he has the wonderful ability to locate these gems of old stuff and the generosity of his nature to pass it on.  I am presenting it to you verbatim as I got it from him  Enjoy.

Life in the USA in the early 1800’s; very interesting statistics when you have nothing else to do.

The War of 1812 concluded in 1815, and in the decades to come, the United States developed a vast transportation system, a national bank, and interstate trade. The economy blossomed, and canals, roads, cities, and industrialization expanded.

England’s defeat in the War of 1812 also removed barriers to westward expansion and, tragically, accelerated Native American removal.

Two hundred years ago, the United States stood at the edge of a frontier — both literally and figuratively. So what was life like at that exciting time?

Population: By 1815, the United States had grown into a country of 8,419,000 people, including about 1.5 million slaves. (Official estimates are available for the entire population in 1815, but slave counts were conducted during the censuses of 1810 and 1820. In the 1810 census, there were 1,191,362 slaves; by the 1820 census, there were 1,538,022 slaves). While a population of less than 10 million seems small compared to today’s count of over 320 million people, the population in 1815 had more than doubled since the country’s first census, taken in 1790, when there were 3,929,214 people. The population would continue to increase by more than 30 percent each decade for much of the 19th century.

Almost all of this growth was due to high birth rates, as immigration was low in 1815, slowed by European wars that raged from 1790 to 1815. Only about 8,000 per year entered during this period. The 1820 census counted 8,385 immigrants, including one from China and one from Africa.

Food: Because these innovations in transportation were still in their infancy in 1815, however, most Americans ate what they grew or hunted locally. Corn and beans were common, along with pork. In the north, cows provided milk, butter, and beef, while in the south, where cattle were less common, venison and other game provided meat. Preserving food in 1815, before the era of refrigeration, required smoking, drying, or salting meat. Vegetables were kept in a root cellar or pickled.

For those who had to purchase their food, one record notes the following retail prices in 1818 in Washington, D.C.: beef cost 6 to 8 cents a pound, potatoes cost 56 cents a bushel, milk was 32 cents a gallon, tea 75 cents to $2.25 a pound. Shoes ran $2.50 a pair. Clothing expenses for a family of six cost $148 a year, though the record does not indicate the quality of the clothes.

Life Expectancy: The boom in native population in the early 19th century was even more remarkable considering the low life expectancies of the time. By one estimate, a white man who had reached his 20th birthday could expect to live just another 19 years. A white woman at 20 would live, on average, only a total of 38.8 years. If measuring from birth, which counted infant mortality, life expectancy would have been even lower. A white family in the early 19th century would typically have seven or eight children, but one would die by age one and another before age 21. And, of course, for slaves, childhood deaths were higher and life expectancy was even lower. About one in three African American children died, and only half lived to adulthood.

Disease was rampant during this time. During the War of 1812, which concluded in 1815, more soldiers died from disease than from fighting. The main causes of death for adults during this period were malaria and tuberculosis, while children most commonly died from measles, mumps, and whooping cough, all preventable today.

Housing: More than four out of every five Americans during the early 19th century still lived on farms. Many farmers during this time also made goods by hand that they’d use, barter, or sell, such as barrels, furniture, or horseshoes. Cities remained relatively small and were clustered around East Coast seaports: New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Boston, and Charleston, South Carolina. In the 1810 census, New York, the largest, was home to 96,373 people. By 1820, the population would reach 123,706. Try out a search of 1800s census records on the Ancestry website.

Employment: Industrialization would soon accelerate urbanization. In England, the Industrial Revolution had begun in the mid-18th century, and despite attempts made to restrict the export of technology, in 1789, a 21-year-old Englishman memorized the plan for a textile mill and then opened a cotton-spinning plant in Rhode Island. By 1810, more than 100 such mills, employing women and children at less than a dollar a week, were operating throughout New England. By the 1830s, textile production would become the country’s largest industry.

Wages for other industries during the time ranged from $10 to $17 a month for seamen. Farm laborers after the end of the War of 1812 earned $12 to $15 dollars a month. A male school teacher earned $10 to $12 a month; a female teacher earned $4 to $10. In Massachusetts, a tailor and printer could both expect to earn $6 a week, while a servant might earn only 50 cents a week.

Transportation: Industrialization affected the country in other ways, of course. In 1815, there were no steam railroads in America, so long-distance travel was by horseback or uncomfortable stagecoach over rutted roads. Cargo moved by horse-team was limited to 25-30 miles a day. But in 1811, Congress signed a contract for the construction of the National Road, the first highway built by the national government. By 1818, it had crossed the Appalachian Mountains, fostering westward expansion.

In 1815, Americans were also discovering steamboat travel. In 1807, Robert Fulton had opened the first steamboat ferry service, between Albany and New York City. By 1815, advances in technology allowed a rival to ferry arms and ammunition to General (later President) Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans, the last battle of the War of 1812, and then to steam back up the Mississippi and then the Ohio to Pittsburgh, proving the feasibility of steamboat navigation of the mighty river.

Entertainment: For recreation, horse racing became increasingly popular by the time of the War of 1812. Singing and sheet music became widely popular, particularly “broadside songs,” or lyrics printed on a sheet of paper and sold for a penny. The sheet had no music, but instructed the purchaser which popular, well-known tune the words could be sung to. The songs often had to do with current political or military events. At the other end of the artistic spectrum, the Boston Handel and Haydn Society, formed in 1815, performed Handel’s “Messiah” in its opening concert.

Finally, singing played a large part in one of the most significant social movements of the time — and in all of America’s history — the Second Great Awakening. From 1790 to 1830, wave after wave of Protestant evangelism swept across the country. Tens of thousands of people would attend a single camp meeting, marked by enthusiastic preaching and audience singing and participation. These more informal services, led by itinerant preachers, also helped tie settlers on the Western frontier to the cultural life of the rest of the country. The Second Great Awakening also fostered greater participation by women and African Americans, who continued developing their artistic traditional of spiritual music during this period.

I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

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Time

March 12, 2016

This matter has been with me for quite a while; an on the spur of the moment I had to decide whether I should say quite a while in the place of quite some time, and made the change.

Time is not only infinite; indeed it is but also much more than that.  Time is the basis and the spine; mortal man has no known definition of Time; we are too small for that; time is immemorial.

Time is the essence of Life; that in turn is a product of Time and the two go together hand and hand never to be separated though, or perhaps I should say because, one created the other and they are therefore, equals in any analysis of one of the two or both at the same time.  Life is, like Time, infinite, forever, both wholesomely rooted in a perfect design that will never end.

No human intervention or any science or discoveries still to come to combine with what we claim that we have already discovered, will ever change or have any influence on Time.  Time is free, everlasting, infinite I have already said, immemorial I have said that too, and will rule and guide us without human interference and the blemishes of human endeavor that are inevitably a part of human nature and was probably intended by Time to be so.

Modern Man is but in its infancy compared to Time and we have existed for a few short moments only when we look at Time.  Let us look at that later; suffices for now we are still infantile in the greater context of time.

Modern Science, to describe it is such because our definitions are lacking, has developed through the eras of the great Greek Philosophers, and some, like modern Sociology have Peer Groups, to guide the younger ones with some clear guidelines to which any new thinking must be submitted for approval, but which often end up in outright rejection by the Peer Group.

So, who is right?  Are the Peers to decide what is true?  What makes them Peers?  In the year of 2016 people like Richard Dawkins would be a Core Peer of the Group but in the time of Socrates he would be a fool and heretic.  Strange thing is that not so long ago in Time he would have perished on the Stake; in the 2016 of today the infantile can rule but in the scales of Time the Peer Groups of yesteryears are being rejected by new realities.

New realities are, of course, all inventions of the 20th century; they have no Peer Group.  “We are free at last” is the hue and cry of the day; there is Space, and that is where our future lies, mankind is about to kick the last remnants of the restricted past into the dust and Rule from Space; no, that’s an understatement; we shall conquer Cyber Pace and rule; indeed we are already in command of Cyber space; hell, they say, you old folks must get with it.

People are standing ready to exit their bedrooms through the mirror in the morning, right on the other side space is waiting and they will walk straight into it through the mirror [a mere press of the button will do it]; out to the office workplace into space they will go; bye for now kids, Daddy will be home tonight.

They will set up new fresh water systems from the moon through all the planets; Mars will be a paradise of Green Peace; Pluto will send clouds when we press the computer button; rain will fall and the sun will shine when we want it to do.  Yes, Oh Yes, Man will take control of his Manifest Destiny.

What did you say?  Did you say or mention God?  Well, don’t do that again.  We are now God.

Until the end of time, they will say,.…, not knowing present mankind will end, well like in tomorrow in time.

But Time will continue.  What is left of last week’s Mankind will pick up the pieces of yesterday and the few weeks of yesteryear and start out on the next Cycle of Time.

To be continued.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

Ikepedia on Super Tuesdays with Super Duper Rubio et al

March 1, 2016

When is America ever to learn?  Will they ever learn?  How can they ever learn that politics are for men?

Putin is a Man, and so is President Xi Jinping of China to mention just two.

How can you guys ever become great again, to quote the Trump, when a failed GOP is using a snot-nosed young kid and still a first generation American baby to assassinate the character of a leading candidate?

You’ve lost it, Grand Old Party, or do you want to hand it to the Hildabeast to finally screw up good and solid the little bit that is still left of America the once Great Society?

If the joker Sharpton gets ready to emigrate, please oh please, I beg you please, don’t let him come down South of your borders.  We have too many of his ilk here already

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

 

The irrelevant Iowa Debate

January 30, 2016

 

To Russia, China, Asia and all Sefrikens [and that gives you about all the parts of the World that count], there is nothing to add to the Headline, except maybe …

The Ttump won it by the proverbial 1000 miles.  Period.

History Part 2

July 27, 2015

My first Post in this series simply called HISTORY was always going to be Part One but I thought about it and dropped the Part One words from the Headline because I wasn’t sure when I was going to do the next one and how many there will be.

This is it now and I can say that I expect the series to go up to Part 6 or thereabouts.

This one is also like the first One different from what will follow in the Parts to come and I want to establish certain principles of history that is quite obviously unknown or not generally understood. Maybe they are only my opinions but I shall leave every reader deciding on his/her own conclusions.

The first point is that though it should not be so any opinion of recorded history largely depends on who wrote the book and/or who reads it. AND [kindly note the capitals] unfortunately it also depends on when it was written and when it is read.

In my own reading career I once read Memoirs of General Grivas on the Cyprus wars between Greeks and Turks. I couldn’t make up my mind who to support. When I read the book again 20 years later I still could not take sides between Grivas and Makarios and be honest with myself.

In the early sixties I read Glimpses of World History by Jawaharlal Nehru and was impressed. Thirty years later I was even more impressed by the great Man when I read the book again. I put him above Gandhi on the World scales of measurement of greatness. The strange anomaly in our country is that many people remember Gandhi [some despise him and some adore him; personally I don’t see him as any great figure in History] but very few ever read anything on Nehru.

My third and last example on the point should suffice.

Having been an adult life long supporter of a multi racial but united South Africa [classified as an extreme Liberal which I was not, though I was a Paton admirer and Fan] I could hardly wait to buy my personal copy of Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela.

I tried to read the book; put it aside several times and tried again and again but something didn’t gel; it became obvious that it was not Mandela’s own writing though it was enthusiastically promoted as the words of the “Great Icon.” I put the book aside for a number of years and re-read it after his attack on America with the warning about Gadaffi that “your enemies are not our enemies,” and after he had informed his successor, a wimp of a man called Thabo Mbeki, to give the prisoners the vote in M’Beki’s election to the Presidency in 1999. That time I managed to get through it with a feeling of despair for our country growing in my mind. The book was nothing more than a personal song of praise to an enormous ego in a large vacuum of utter emptiness.

I have learned to read all history as the opinion of one person. This is therefore, the way you can and should, read this. It is an opinion and I would like to hear from you before I go onto a very important Part Three about parallels and repetition of history.

You may read this Post in the meantime:

http://thefederalist.com/2015/07/20/europe-is-partying-like-its-1939/

 Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

 

The Education level of the Internet

July 5, 2015

Try changing the font display size in Google Chrome; double dare you. You will find the answer to the Headline question; have your pick:

Zero

Zilch

Nil

Nothing

Minus sub Zero

Destroying all brain functions

Etc. Repeat one million times.

Then you wonder why kids just out of high school don’t know how far China is from Russia? Ask any number in your town and photograph the blank stares in the eyes nine out of ten times, if not all ten. But they will all walk around with tablets and laptops or smart phones.

Then add two and two together and let your mind roam about the fact that they all have the vote! What is this World coming to?

 Ike Jakson

Saka Americoon in Americus GA USA

ikejakson@gmail.com

 

Memories of my Journey of Life

May 31, 2015

There are so many; each one is precious beyond description.

 Then we have the rare ones; they are perhaps not more precious than others but they are so rare that they dare not be told in mortal words. They are to be gift wrapped and passed on with love and care.

 But can you wrap a memory and transmit it?

 I shall try because this one is so precious and I am faced with another problem with him. It is copyright and the author as well as the Blog Owner are such special people, plus in this instance the man only known as Nolanimrod who passed the link on to me is more than precious.

 Please do yourself the favor and read this link with great care. I am down on the ground but my spirits are soaring high above. Please allow me some time to explain. I shall do that later when I have recovered; just read this now:

 http://takimag.com/article/all_this_i_had_forgotten_theodore_dalrymple/print#axzz3bkS6h7dy

 Recognition and Credit to and in honor of Taki’s Magazine

 

South Africa to the World

May 5, 2015

Good morning America.

You all want to read the South African Ferguson MO crap? Don’t pay much attention to the Article; just read the comments and see how we handle this remarkable opportunity of equality and unity between races.

http://www.fin24.com/Economy/Did-apartheid-SA-grow-at-a-faster-economic-rate-than-post-apartheid-SA-20150503

Welcome to the Rainbow Nation. Free at last, and celebrating after 21 horrendous years of decline towards where it started, hailed at the time as a Wonder, the New Africa.

Tell you what; send a copy to Jimmy Carter. The asshole declared the 1994 Election Free and Fair.

 ikejakson@gmail.com

African America the next Rainbow Nation

April 15, 2015

Have a good look at your future. Read all the links in this one:

https://ikejakson.wordpress.com/2015/04/14/in-memory-of-naspers/

Get a card reader to interpret if for you.

Then you start taking photographs of all your monuments while you still have them and save it for your grandchildren.

 ikejakson@gmail.com

In Memory of Ouboet March 20th of 1938 to August 22nd of 2009

March 20, 2015

There are days one can never erase; this is one that will be remembered even long after I have gone.

To say that I have had no role models would not be quite true. Our Dad was in his last years the man I admired most; he was strict, strong but of the kind and the times when you obeyed your father even if you didn’t agree. He had lived during harsh times in a harsh world in the harshest of all circumstances and I regret that I first found out that I loved him in the last few years of his life when I discovered that I didn’t know everything as I thought I did about seven years earlier. We enjoyed each other with complete faith in one another then but had only three years of that before he died when I had just reached 27 years of age.

By that time Ouboet was a man and the undisputed leader of the clan although he rejected the notion. He lived a resolute life; never made one single mistake and started building a small fortune in a trust by his wits and dedication to sound financial principles not based on but in line with the philosophy of Warren Buffet long before this great man became as well known as he is today.

The Company he worked for had by 1990 grown into one of the two largest financial conglomerates in South Africa. Early 1994 he amazed some and annoyed a few others in management by announcing his serious objections to investment in what he termed Internet Money and also questioned the way management was handling investment of their Pensioners Medical Aid money; he was in a very senior position then and also managed the affairs of the Pensioners Medical Aid Fund

The massive Conglomerate was stunned and offered to promote him; he confounded them by promptly refusing to accept the bribe; that in turn left them with no alternative but to fire him but the Pensioners Medical Aid held all the trump cards and played them by unanimously electing him as Chairman of the Medical Aid. The Conglomerate was so stunned by this that they were actually glad when Ouboet asked for early retirement from the Company one year after taking up Chairmanship of the Pensioners Medical Aid Fund.

He would eventually be re-elected in this position year after year while fighting for their rights against the Company he had worked with for 38 years.

Had he not become ill he would have seen victory but he only just missed it; just more than a year after he passed on a High Court Judge ruled in favor of the Medical Aid Fund and ordered the Conglomerate to find an appropriate agreement on the final quantum of the claim by the Medical Aid Fund and to pay.

Having known him for so long I am sure he would have grunted a laugh at the way victory came; it was all done in Chambers behind closed doors; the press was never invited. I am sure they were told with all the power of the judiciary not to publish anything but Ouboet was never a man for publicity anyway. He always just put his head down, refused to back off when he thought he was right and pursued what he considered the right course.

Sometimes I feel that he never really left us; when cousin Jannie passed on this past Monday I talked to Ouboet for solace because I felt lonely for the first time in my life.

https://ikejakson.wordpress.com/2015/03/18/jannie-koegelenberg-april-10th-1968-to-march-16th-2015/

The two of them met only once but I am sure that they will guide me on what I must now do with a large conglomerate that overstepped the mark in my life.

In the meantime it is still Ouboet’s birthday today. The clan will not forget.

 ikejakson@gmail.com