Posts Tagged ‘South Africa’

On Time and this day 50 years ago September 6th of 1966 when a Great Man died

September 6, 2016

It was also on a Tuesday, about 10 am that morning when the news came over the radio.  I had turned 26 just one month before that fateful day and was still in the formative years of my political life; it was in any event too early for me having grown up in an apolitical home, to form an opinion of the event but it shocked South Africa in its boots.

Doctor Hendrik French Verwoerd Prime Minister was assassinated by a man of a deranged soul and mind and died in his seat in Parliament that morning.

South Africa was divided between those who mourned and those who rejoiced.

I had to make a choice, and looking back I think that I made the right choice to stay above the fray and remained aloof.

In the aftermath of all South Africa showed a good sign of the heart by declaring the killer, a lost soul with a demented mind, a ward of the State President and sent to life imprisonment where he died at quite a ripe age.

Why do I place this today?

I shall reply to that in another Post. It will have to suffice for the day that any student of history will have to consider where the World stood at that time.  It was a different World to today.

The entire World is at another road crossing than it was then.  In South Africa of today we are proud of what Hendrik Verwoerd stood for; those who differ with me on this point, in South Africa or outside, read up before you judge.

To be followed up.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

Of Time and a little humor in Politics

July 23, 2016

I break my series on Time for a brief note on a little humor in the doom and gloom of Politics of 2016.

We need it; mankind is still able to smile and a lot of it manages to slip through all the rancor that besets us about War and Terror, threats about the End that is drawing nigh; some even call it “and now the beginning of the End has begun” but that is not new either.

Have a break and smile.  My Gmail is down; our banks have fallen with the activity of all the mice, lice, the crawling black hordes of the Nether Regions have invaded our shores like locusts, leeches, parasites and clouds  of financial vermin, but there is still time for a smile.

Pause and enjoy.

The Bama stands out for what he is: a mere little Boy in a game for Men.

Putin and Bama Jim 20151015

 

Bama and Putin Cartoon 20160722

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

Of Time and some Statistics of Old America

June 29, 2016

This may look like a bit of side tracking in my series of Posts on Time but it is not.  It fits in with the topic that I have in mind and it came at a time that is appropriate on this day before we leave June of 2016.

My friend Iowa Jim passed it on in email; he has the wonderful ability to locate these gems of old stuff and the generosity of his nature to pass it on.  I am presenting it to you verbatim as I got it from him  Enjoy.

Life in the USA in the early 1800’s; very interesting statistics when you have nothing else to do.

The War of 1812 concluded in 1815, and in the decades to come, the United States developed a vast transportation system, a national bank, and interstate trade. The economy blossomed, and canals, roads, cities, and industrialization expanded.

England’s defeat in the War of 1812 also removed barriers to westward expansion and, tragically, accelerated Native American removal.

Two hundred years ago, the United States stood at the edge of a frontier — both literally and figuratively. So what was life like at that exciting time?

Population: By 1815, the United States had grown into a country of 8,419,000 people, including about 1.5 million slaves. (Official estimates are available for the entire population in 1815, but slave counts were conducted during the censuses of 1810 and 1820. In the 1810 census, there were 1,191,362 slaves; by the 1820 census, there were 1,538,022 slaves). While a population of less than 10 million seems small compared to today’s count of over 320 million people, the population in 1815 had more than doubled since the country’s first census, taken in 1790, when there were 3,929,214 people. The population would continue to increase by more than 30 percent each decade for much of the 19th century.

Almost all of this growth was due to high birth rates, as immigration was low in 1815, slowed by European wars that raged from 1790 to 1815. Only about 8,000 per year entered during this period. The 1820 census counted 8,385 immigrants, including one from China and one from Africa.

Food: Because these innovations in transportation were still in their infancy in 1815, however, most Americans ate what they grew or hunted locally. Corn and beans were common, along with pork. In the north, cows provided milk, butter, and beef, while in the south, where cattle were less common, venison and other game provided meat. Preserving food in 1815, before the era of refrigeration, required smoking, drying, or salting meat. Vegetables were kept in a root cellar or pickled.

For those who had to purchase their food, one record notes the following retail prices in 1818 in Washington, D.C.: beef cost 6 to 8 cents a pound, potatoes cost 56 cents a bushel, milk was 32 cents a gallon, tea 75 cents to $2.25 a pound. Shoes ran $2.50 a pair. Clothing expenses for a family of six cost $148 a year, though the record does not indicate the quality of the clothes.

Life Expectancy: The boom in native population in the early 19th century was even more remarkable considering the low life expectancies of the time. By one estimate, a white man who had reached his 20th birthday could expect to live just another 19 years. A white woman at 20 would live, on average, only a total of 38.8 years. If measuring from birth, which counted infant mortality, life expectancy would have been even lower. A white family in the early 19th century would typically have seven or eight children, but one would die by age one and another before age 21. And, of course, for slaves, childhood deaths were higher and life expectancy was even lower. About one in three African American children died, and only half lived to adulthood.

Disease was rampant during this time. During the War of 1812, which concluded in 1815, more soldiers died from disease than from fighting. The main causes of death for adults during this period were malaria and tuberculosis, while children most commonly died from measles, mumps, and whooping cough, all preventable today.

Housing: More than four out of every five Americans during the early 19th century still lived on farms. Many farmers during this time also made goods by hand that they’d use, barter, or sell, such as barrels, furniture, or horseshoes. Cities remained relatively small and were clustered around East Coast seaports: New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Boston, and Charleston, South Carolina. In the 1810 census, New York, the largest, was home to 96,373 people. By 1820, the population would reach 123,706. Try out a search of 1800s census records on the Ancestry website.

Employment: Industrialization would soon accelerate urbanization. In England, the Industrial Revolution had begun in the mid-18th century, and despite attempts made to restrict the export of technology, in 1789, a 21-year-old Englishman memorized the plan for a textile mill and then opened a cotton-spinning plant in Rhode Island. By 1810, more than 100 such mills, employing women and children at less than a dollar a week, were operating throughout New England. By the 1830s, textile production would become the country’s largest industry.

Wages for other industries during the time ranged from $10 to $17 a month for seamen. Farm laborers after the end of the War of 1812 earned $12 to $15 dollars a month. A male school teacher earned $10 to $12 a month; a female teacher earned $4 to $10. In Massachusetts, a tailor and printer could both expect to earn $6 a week, while a servant might earn only 50 cents a week.

Transportation: Industrialization affected the country in other ways, of course. In 1815, there were no steam railroads in America, so long-distance travel was by horseback or uncomfortable stagecoach over rutted roads. Cargo moved by horse-team was limited to 25-30 miles a day. But in 1811, Congress signed a contract for the construction of the National Road, the first highway built by the national government. By 1818, it had crossed the Appalachian Mountains, fostering westward expansion.

In 1815, Americans were also discovering steamboat travel. In 1807, Robert Fulton had opened the first steamboat ferry service, between Albany and New York City. By 1815, advances in technology allowed a rival to ferry arms and ammunition to General (later President) Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans, the last battle of the War of 1812, and then to steam back up the Mississippi and then the Ohio to Pittsburgh, proving the feasibility of steamboat navigation of the mighty river.

Entertainment: For recreation, horse racing became increasingly popular by the time of the War of 1812. Singing and sheet music became widely popular, particularly “broadside songs,” or lyrics printed on a sheet of paper and sold for a penny. The sheet had no music, but instructed the purchaser which popular, well-known tune the words could be sung to. The songs often had to do with current political or military events. At the other end of the artistic spectrum, the Boston Handel and Haydn Society, formed in 1815, performed Handel’s “Messiah” in its opening concert.

Finally, singing played a large part in one of the most significant social movements of the time — and in all of America’s history — the Second Great Awakening. From 1790 to 1830, wave after wave of Protestant evangelism swept across the country. Tens of thousands of people would attend a single camp meeting, marked by enthusiastic preaching and audience singing and participation. These more informal services, led by itinerant preachers, also helped tie settlers on the Western frontier to the cultural life of the rest of the country. The Second Great Awakening also fostered greater participation by women and African Americans, who continued developing their artistic traditional of spiritual music during this period.

I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

It just wasn’t the right Time, Little Marco

March 16, 2016

I am in a series of Posts on Time and thought hard and long whether I may not spoil it by this Post but it had to be said; this is not always the case with Time but I realized that there are times when you have to stick your neck out regardless of the consequences.

Americans of today generally fail the Test of Time because they live in a World of make believe of some past glory that comes from somewhere in the past that they have adopted as their own without even understanding the basics of Time.

Little Marco, oh let me call you Young Marco, you messed around in an adult World.  To come today, from a youngster like you and only a first generation American to boot, to get hammered for your presumptuousness you might have been forgiven, but then to state that “America is a special place; where you come from does not determine where you are going,” heck, young man that is your problem.  Step back Marco, let the people who have been there for twelve generations, proved themselves and paid their dues, yes, let them say that.

Marco, in Russia and China you would not have had a single chance.  Ok, now I can hear you say that you don’t like them.  You also did not like your Fatherland, Marco.

In Africa you would have been fish bait within one hour after announcing your intentions.  Now don’t come telling me that you don’t like Africa either; it’s an old Continent.  The leaders appointed by their forefathers are governing; the rest do as they are told.  It works, I tell you it does.

OK, the colonials introduced a Western form of Government, telling the people they need a Democracy and things almost got out of hand, but the leading families re-introduced the old systems and advised the people that they would  call it Democracy to keep the money flowing from America and to eat MacDonald hot fries.

Bide your time, Marco.  You’ve screwed up and may not get a second chance for a long time.  Pay your dues now and just don’t force things.  Face it Marco, you only got as far as you did, and were allowed to do so by the Party to take the Don out.  You failed, Marco and the DOP [that may be new to you; it’s now spelt with a D for Dead Old Party] will remember; it’s not a Party for brash youngsters in any event.  They only used you as much as they are using Cruz now.

But that’s his problem.  Don’t you go and tarnish your name now by throwing your lot in with Cruz.

Cheerio, sonny-boy; better luck next time.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

The irrelevant Iowa Debate with an update.

January 30, 2016

To Russia, China, Asia and all Sefrikens [and that gives you about all the parts of the World that count], there is nothing to add to the Headline, except maybe …

The Trump won it by the proverbial 1000 miles.  Period.

Oh well, perhaps it is a good idea to read what they say across the pond.  It’s funny in a way, but so are the British and their little Island, not to mention the Guardian jornolosts.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jan/29/republican-race-donald-trump-lose-victory-rivals?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H&utm_term=153879&subid=15255091&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

 

 

History Part 2

July 27, 2015

My first Post in this series simply called HISTORY was always going to be Part One but I thought about it and dropped the Part One words from the Headline because I wasn’t sure when I was going to do the next one and how many there will be.

This is it now and I can say that I expect the series to go up to Part 6 or thereabouts.

This one is also like the first One different from what will follow in the Parts to come and I want to establish certain principles of history that is quite obviously unknown or not generally understood. Maybe they are only my opinions but I shall leave every reader deciding on his/her own conclusions.

The first point is that though it should not be so any opinion of recorded history largely depends on who wrote the book and/or who reads it. AND [kindly note the capitals] unfortunately it also depends on when it was written and when it is read.

In my own reading career I once read Memoirs of General Grivas on the Cyprus wars between Greeks and Turks. I couldn’t make up my mind who to support. When I read the book again 20 years later I still could not take sides between Grivas and Makarios and be honest with myself.

In the early sixties I read Glimpses of World History by Jawaharlal Nehru and was impressed. Thirty years later I was even more impressed by the great Man when I read the book again. I put him above Gandhi on the World scales of measurement of greatness. The strange anomaly in our country is that many people remember Gandhi [some despise him and some adore him; personally I don’t see him as any great figure in History] but very few ever read anything on Nehru.

My third and last example on the point should suffice.

Having been an adult life long supporter of a multi racial but united South Africa [classified as an extreme Liberal which I was not, though I was a Paton admirer and Fan] I could hardly wait to buy my personal copy of Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela.

I tried to read the book; put it aside several times and tried again and again but something didn’t gel; it became obvious that it was not Mandela’s own writing though it was enthusiastically promoted as the words of the “Great Icon.” I put the book aside for a number of years and re-read it after his attack on America with the warning about Gadaffi that “your enemies are not our enemies,” and after he had informed his successor, a wimp of a man called Thabo Mbeki, to give the prisoners the vote in M’Beki’s election to the Presidency in 1999. That time I managed to get through it with a feeling of despair for our country growing in my mind. The book was nothing more than a personal song of praise to an enormous ego in a large vacuum of utter emptiness.

I have learned to read all history as the opinion of one person. This is therefore, the way you can and should, read this. It is an opinion and I would like to hear from you before I go onto a very important Part Three about parallels and repetition of history.

You may read this Post in the meantime:

http://thefederalist.com/2015/07/20/europe-is-partying-like-its-1939/

 Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

 

Sundays, sunny days and clear skies

June 21, 2015

To a dear friend I care for and sommer to all of you.

It’s not bad here at 2015/06/21 09:43:24 AM on my computer this morning.

Today is the shortest day in our hemisphere; my weather program says sunrise at 07:47 and sunset at 17:47 i.e. exactly 10 hours sunlight. Some years ago I did the East Coast of America in June and picked a place called East Point in Maine to overnight and wait for the 4th of July. In your own Motorhome you can stand wherever you want to anyway. East Point is more or less on latitude 45 and happens to be the Eastern-most point of the ole US of A. It’s also the home base of the Maine Lobster. The mid-day temperature was Hotazel like in the Western Transvaal in mid December.

Did you know that the sun runs faster near end March and end September than June up north and December down here? At “full speed” it regularly moves up to 3 minutes per day but slows down from early June or December and often stands dead still for two or three days at a time for refueling, maintenance and taking on migrant labor to repair and replace whatever is needed for the return run? It often remains stationary for almost a week around 21st June and December. It’s all high-tech scientifically mille-seconds accurate.

You can easily prove it with a simpler example; watching a pumpkin plant from the day it sprouts the first leave above ground. You will also note that the grown pumpkin doesn’t roll off the earth at night time.

All migrant workers are engaged for exactly ten days at a time; they have to get off before the permanent crew members restart the engines. When old Sun hits the Equator March and September it really goes at top speed sometimes almost touching 4 minutes on a good day.

Come stay with me one day and I will show you my statistics of the four seasons, from which one feller name of Ike Jakson developed the modern Flat Earth Theory.

Can you buy me some Hulett’s brown caramel sugar and bring it with you next time you visit old civilization? Ockie has run out of it at the Oasis Supermarket. I shall refund you.

PS: The word “sommer” in the first line is a Dutch word, meaning sommer, like in it’s sommer a lekka word.

 ikejakson@gmail.com

 

Air Force One has a New Owner

April 7, 2015

It is actually a brand new One and it is smarter and better with a lot more Hi-Tech than the one that the little Bama klonkie now flies.

Here it is:

[Heck, I can’t get the pic in and it got several awards on its own too; will keep on trying]

Meantime, see:

 https://twitter.com/mandyldewaal/status/585352573441413120?t=1&cn=cmVjb3NfbmV0d29ya19kaWdlc3RfdHJpZ2dlcmVk&sig=09f77c60833dc20cc86690bd9efad3fbf941da8c&al=1&refsrc=email&iid=eb56d49e97b347e386ac70c3242cfc17&autoactions=1428413952&uid=382507548&nid=244+138

 for the picture.

Watch the finger, klonkie. If you know what’s good for you, get a new version of your limmo ready for him too.

Emperor of all the riches of All of Africa, the Honorable Jacob Regop Zuma of the eighteen wives.

ikejakson@gmail.com

Today 363 years ago

April 6, 2015

It was April 6th 1652, about 150 years after the first settlers set foot on American soil.

See, and read the closing lines:

https://ikejakson.wordpress.com/2015/04/06/van-riebeeck-day-april-6th-2015/

It was also 124 years before American Independence Day. New Amsterdam became New York on Sept 8th 1664, barely 8 years later. Holland Michigan was settled in 1847 and introduced Calvinism and the Dutch way of life that still exists in America today.

Martin van Buren was elected in 1836 to become the 8th President of America. He had also served as the 10th Secretary of State under President Andrew Jackson.

In between chasing skirt and same sex marriages Bill Clinton finally saw and smiled on the removal of White Government in South Africa in 1994.

What awaits America in Africa today but Rejection? We have no fears of China and Russia; we never had. They somehow assist in keeping things from falling apart at the seams in South Africa today. America has lost its lure. How sad?

 ikejakson@gmail.com

Days, weeks and Centuries Africa 1960 to 2010 Part Two

January 16, 2015

We are here at last; in the middle of the screen in Large Bold: The Half Century of Africa. It was their Manifest Destiny, and the only one they would ever have. The eyes of the World turned and tuned in on Sub-Saharan Africa when JFK stepped into the White House on January 20th of 1961.

I was at this point in what was to be a high quality analysis of South and Southern Sub-Saharan Africa, about the role of the computer in Africa and the final beautiful day of April 27th of 1994 when we rejoined the family of World Nations as a free multi-racial South Africa when I received the Bangkok Thailand email that I published in:

https://ikejakson.wordpress.com/2015/01/13/south-africa-1652-to-2015-an-interlude-according-to-fatso/

Full sice Zuma and one spouse

Fatso and one spousal Unit.

My thinking changed after that. In the aforementioned Post on Fatso you really have it all and there is very little I can add to make it sound a little more positive.

All I can do is add this Link for your edification:

http://www.fin24.com/Economy/Labour/InsideLabour/Labour-Wrap-2015-Time-for-a-reality-check-20150115

If you want to go to some trouble as we all must at many different times to Google the names in the Posts you will have all you need of the rest.

Then read:

http://www.fin24.com/Companies/Financial-Services/Tale-of-two-bankers-20150102

Finally:

http://www.fin24.com/Economy/SA-12th-biggest-exporter-of-illicit-money-20141216

I have given this a lot of thought. If you don’t have enough time now, first do whatever you have to with other things, then return to this Post and repeat it a number of times until you get it all.

In all of this you will have Southern and particularly South Africa 1960 to 2010 plus the next generation, say, to 1935 or one more to take us to 2060?

By then, unless America can pull something out of the hat Africa will be controlled by China and America to her side of the pond. Europe, the Euro, and the Euro Zone will change, argue, fight and generally make a lot of noise but will remain fractured each with its own problems but with Russia as the undisputed leader and Switzerland to keep an eye on the money supply for many decades to come.

Homogeny is, contrary to general wisdom, not only a matter of genes; in fact it is a lot more than that; homogeny of purpose, order, standards and the Rule of Law will shape the future of our World or ….. what we have now will crack at the seams and the proletariat will reclaim their rightful place in Societies around the Globe.

ikejakson@gmail.com