On Time and this day 50 years ago September 6th of 1966 when a Great Man died

September 6, 2016

It was also on a Tuesday, about 10 am that morning when the news came over the radio.  I had turned 26 just one month before that fateful day and was still in the formative years of my political life; it was in any event too early for me having grown up in an apolitical home, to form an opinion of the event but it shocked South Africa in its boots.

Doctor Hendrik French Verwoerd Prime Minister was assassinated by a man of a deranged soul and mind and died in his seat in Parliament that morning.

South Africa was divided between those who mourned and those who rejoiced.

I had to make a choice, and looking back I think that I made the right choice to stay above the fray and remained aloof.

In the aftermath of all South Africa showed a good sign of the heart by declaring the killer, a lost soul with a demented mind, a ward of the State President and sent to life imprisonment where he died at quite a ripe age.

Why do I place this today?

I shall reply to that in another Post. It will have to suffice for the day that any student of history will have to consider where the World stood at that time.  It was a different World to today.

The entire World is at another road crossing than it was then.  In South Africa of today we are proud of what Hendrik Verwoerd stood for; those who differ with me on this point, in South Africa or outside, read up before you judge.

To be followed up.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

One Short Interlude in my Series of Posts on Time and Related Matters

August 14, 2016

I hope this is a one-off because I want to spend the remainder of my Blogging Career on Time and matters of Time; it is something that needs to be done before I go and it needs to be done well.

For this interlude this is one of maybe two Posts on Hi-Tech, looked at from the vantage point of my time in Life.

Hi-Tech has overtaken the World and had some good in it but is now run by children and it stinks.  That is why it is a bubble that simply cannot last, not even very long after today.  I see signs that it is already crumbling at the edges in the Financial World and hope for some control over it before I depart these shores.  Today I have a challenge to Google et al, and to all the young kids that are designing hi-tech computer systems.

Wake up and develop some conscience about putting something back for those who bred you, fed you, and those that dressed you, sent you to school and often for years after that still cared for you.  Start caring for them, if you can manage that.  Remember them because your time must come too.

How about some good deed from Hi-Tech?  The first one is for Cell Phone designers.

I need a cell phone for people with eye and hearing impediments. It must have “large print on the screen” and large keys as well as a loud ringing tone; just one like the old handset phones. Don’t need no SMS, camera, icons or any rubbish; no music or videos. Come on Hi-Tech; you stink but you can’t be that stupid. And I don’t need Internet or Google or any of the stupid things on the darn instrument, just a straight simple old-time phone.  Go ahead and distribute; I shall pay cash for mine but you idiots should have some conscience and give it for FREE AND GRATIS to the folks that put you into business in the first place.

Apologies to my readers that the email address below is still barred.  Ike Jakson is alive and well and still very much around.  I am not that stupid.  Google confirms that the name exists and nobody can take it away from me but not even I can get access to the account.

COME ON GOOGLE.  STOP WARRING WINDOWS AND FIX YOUR GMAIL SYSTEMS.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

Of Time and a little humor in Politics

July 23, 2016

I break my series on Time for a brief note on a little humor in the doom and gloom of Politics of 2016.

We need it; mankind is still able to smile and a lot of it manages to slip through all the rancor that besets us about War and Terror, threats about the End that is drawing nigh; some even call it “and now the beginning of the End has begun” but that is not new either.

Have a break and smile.  My Gmail is down; our banks have fallen with the activity of all the mice, lice, the crawling black hordes of the Nether Regions have invaded our shores like locusts, leeches, parasites and clouds  of financial vermin, but there is still time for a smile.

Pause and enjoy.

The Bama stands out for what he is: a mere little Boy in a game for Men.

Putin and Bama Jim 20151015

 

Bama and Putin Cartoon 20160722

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

Of Time and some Statistics of Old America

June 29, 2016

This may look like a bit of side tracking in my series of Posts on Time but it is not.  It fits in with the topic that I have in mind and it came at a time that is appropriate on this day before we leave June of 2016.

My friend Iowa Jim passed it on in email; he has the wonderful ability to locate these gems of old stuff and the generosity of his nature to pass it on.  I am presenting it to you verbatim as I got it from him  Enjoy.

Life in the USA in the early 1800’s; very interesting statistics when you have nothing else to do.

The War of 1812 concluded in 1815, and in the decades to come, the United States developed a vast transportation system, a national bank, and interstate trade. The economy blossomed, and canals, roads, cities, and industrialization expanded.

England’s defeat in the War of 1812 also removed barriers to westward expansion and, tragically, accelerated Native American removal.

Two hundred years ago, the United States stood at the edge of a frontier — both literally and figuratively. So what was life like at that exciting time?

Population: By 1815, the United States had grown into a country of 8,419,000 people, including about 1.5 million slaves. (Official estimates are available for the entire population in 1815, but slave counts were conducted during the censuses of 1810 and 1820. In the 1810 census, there were 1,191,362 slaves; by the 1820 census, there were 1,538,022 slaves). While a population of less than 10 million seems small compared to today’s count of over 320 million people, the population in 1815 had more than doubled since the country’s first census, taken in 1790, when there were 3,929,214 people. The population would continue to increase by more than 30 percent each decade for much of the 19th century.

Almost all of this growth was due to high birth rates, as immigration was low in 1815, slowed by European wars that raged from 1790 to 1815. Only about 8,000 per year entered during this period. The 1820 census counted 8,385 immigrants, including one from China and one from Africa.

Food: Because these innovations in transportation were still in their infancy in 1815, however, most Americans ate what they grew or hunted locally. Corn and beans were common, along with pork. In the north, cows provided milk, butter, and beef, while in the south, where cattle were less common, venison and other game provided meat. Preserving food in 1815, before the era of refrigeration, required smoking, drying, or salting meat. Vegetables were kept in a root cellar or pickled.

For those who had to purchase their food, one record notes the following retail prices in 1818 in Washington, D.C.: beef cost 6 to 8 cents a pound, potatoes cost 56 cents a bushel, milk was 32 cents a gallon, tea 75 cents to $2.25 a pound. Shoes ran $2.50 a pair. Clothing expenses for a family of six cost $148 a year, though the record does not indicate the quality of the clothes.

Life Expectancy: The boom in native population in the early 19th century was even more remarkable considering the low life expectancies of the time. By one estimate, a white man who had reached his 20th birthday could expect to live just another 19 years. A white woman at 20 would live, on average, only a total of 38.8 years. If measuring from birth, which counted infant mortality, life expectancy would have been even lower. A white family in the early 19th century would typically have seven or eight children, but one would die by age one and another before age 21. And, of course, for slaves, childhood deaths were higher and life expectancy was even lower. About one in three African American children died, and only half lived to adulthood.

Disease was rampant during this time. During the War of 1812, which concluded in 1815, more soldiers died from disease than from fighting. The main causes of death for adults during this period were malaria and tuberculosis, while children most commonly died from measles, mumps, and whooping cough, all preventable today.

Housing: More than four out of every five Americans during the early 19th century still lived on farms. Many farmers during this time also made goods by hand that they’d use, barter, or sell, such as barrels, furniture, or horseshoes. Cities remained relatively small and were clustered around East Coast seaports: New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Boston, and Charleston, South Carolina. In the 1810 census, New York, the largest, was home to 96,373 people. By 1820, the population would reach 123,706. Try out a search of 1800s census records on the Ancestry website.

Employment: Industrialization would soon accelerate urbanization. In England, the Industrial Revolution had begun in the mid-18th century, and despite attempts made to restrict the export of technology, in 1789, a 21-year-old Englishman memorized the plan for a textile mill and then opened a cotton-spinning plant in Rhode Island. By 1810, more than 100 such mills, employing women and children at less than a dollar a week, were operating throughout New England. By the 1830s, textile production would become the country’s largest industry.

Wages for other industries during the time ranged from $10 to $17 a month for seamen. Farm laborers after the end of the War of 1812 earned $12 to $15 dollars a month. A male school teacher earned $10 to $12 a month; a female teacher earned $4 to $10. In Massachusetts, a tailor and printer could both expect to earn $6 a week, while a servant might earn only 50 cents a week.

Transportation: Industrialization affected the country in other ways, of course. In 1815, there were no steam railroads in America, so long-distance travel was by horseback or uncomfortable stagecoach over rutted roads. Cargo moved by horse-team was limited to 25-30 miles a day. But in 1811, Congress signed a contract for the construction of the National Road, the first highway built by the national government. By 1818, it had crossed the Appalachian Mountains, fostering westward expansion.

In 1815, Americans were also discovering steamboat travel. In 1807, Robert Fulton had opened the first steamboat ferry service, between Albany and New York City. By 1815, advances in technology allowed a rival to ferry arms and ammunition to General (later President) Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans, the last battle of the War of 1812, and then to steam back up the Mississippi and then the Ohio to Pittsburgh, proving the feasibility of steamboat navigation of the mighty river.

Entertainment: For recreation, horse racing became increasingly popular by the time of the War of 1812. Singing and sheet music became widely popular, particularly “broadside songs,” or lyrics printed on a sheet of paper and sold for a penny. The sheet had no music, but instructed the purchaser which popular, well-known tune the words could be sung to. The songs often had to do with current political or military events. At the other end of the artistic spectrum, the Boston Handel and Haydn Society, formed in 1815, performed Handel’s “Messiah” in its opening concert.

Finally, singing played a large part in one of the most significant social movements of the time — and in all of America’s history — the Second Great Awakening. From 1790 to 1830, wave after wave of Protestant evangelism swept across the country. Tens of thousands of people would attend a single camp meeting, marked by enthusiastic preaching and audience singing and participation. These more informal services, led by itinerant preachers, also helped tie settlers on the Western frontier to the cultural life of the rest of the country. The Second Great Awakening also fostered greater participation by women and African Americans, who continued developing their artistic traditional of spiritual music during this period.

I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

Of Time and Seasons and about Seasons of Time

May 7, 2016

This time of the year the Sun is going at its fastest northwards before it slows down for the longest day in the Northern Hemisphere.  In human time it lingers there for up to seven days, not moving at all before restarting the engines round about 21st June for the run South.  It has never changed.

As long as Man knows it has been like that.  We have learned that it is entirely and positively reliable, made so by the Hand of the Grand Designer of the Universe and maintained by Him.

This year, and this day of May 7th, the latter so determined by knowledge that Humankind has acquired through processes of learning and study has been no exception.

The seasons have brought about some changes as modified by Nature and to some extent by what Mankind has done [or not done] but like Time, the Seasons are set.  Man and animal living, loving or whatever we do, have coped as well as we could with drought in the Southern while our compatriots in the Northern parts have had to cope with storms, floods and severe cold.  All this has happened before and will happen again.

Nobody I have read has as far as I know ever offered an explanation for the apparent difference of the movement of the sun, or I should say the “speed of the cycle” in human time measurements, but it is there.  It clocks up to 4 minutes a day near top speed and the two lengthy sojourns at the “turnaround” North and South are not enough to disturb the common logic that it is all pre-determined by a Mighty Hand.

These things and what follows herein are my own philosophies and I don’t expect any hunters for my signature to stand in line at the front door, but I am awed by those who can write and discuss God and Faith in great words, books and even in Blogging.  I don’t have that gift.

However, I admit that my thinking has been influenced by a few people better known than I am.

The first one, John Steinbeck, is my favorite and in my thinking the greatest writer of all times except for the writer[s] of the Scriptures in all the major Faiths.  I managed to collect all Steinbeck’s works during his lifetime [1902 to 1968] except his very first book, ‘The Wayward Bus’ that I found by chance in a second hand bookshop at a few shillings not long after his departure.  I think he self-published it; it was only a short work but the genius of the future Nobel was already visible.

Steinbeck as far as I know never disclosed his own religion; he certainly did not make any noise or created any fuss about it, but his understanding of God and mankind comes through as no other one ever managed.  There is no other as deep as Steinbeck’s ‘To a God Unknown’ about man and God, or equal in my experience.  In ‘The Winter of our Discontent’ [1961] he paints a vivid picture of Man in agony with his conscience.  He gets very close to craft the painting of Ethan Hawley into exquisite art.  The end of the work is a masterpiece of pure art.

In ‘East of Eden’ Steinbeck becomes alive as a Man; part of his history, his family and his deep faith in family life all mingle with the joy and tragedy of those who lived and died, those who died but never lived and the few who will for ever live.

Then there is ‘Travels with Charley’ and what can anyone say on that?

I will get to that masterpiece, the best ever travelogue by anyone, and to the other writers who inspired me.  Let us now look at the Seasons of Time.

This time of the year, more or less almost spot on the 7th of May and again about 7th of November the Seasons of Nature change in both Southern and Northern Hemispheres.  It has been like that for ever and will endure forever.

Nature is our only guide to what has been and what will be.

I do not believe the Prophets of Doom or the gullible predictions of how great Mankind can make the World.  Nature is [and was] part of the creation, and I live very close to it every day of my life.

I don’t mind the speculations of Darwin and his ilk; actually it is great reading and great opportunities for conversation but it is no science.

Science as developed by fragile Mankind is based on theory and the limits of understanding what is far beyond our capabilities, and even further beyond our need to know more than that.

All the great Faiths and Religions are in perfect harmony on Nature and Creation, and I accept that evolution was and still is part of the Creation and that they are perfect similarities; that some humans would claim that they are incongruent is and remains a mystery to me.

The Seasons of Nature tell me that they are part of the Greatness of God, our Creator and the Great Hand that guides our future.

I therefore on this day want to state where I stand and will take you through another favorite writer, though I did not agree with him on everything in life of his later years I respect him for ‘The Source’ and his name is: James Michener.

‘The Source’ was first published in 1965; it does not say what I am about to say but that is what I took from it way back, sometimes forgot about, but now wish to state as my motto.

I believe in God the Almighty Creator and our Destiny AND I believe that:

God=Jehovah=Allah=Jaweh=God

And I don’t know or understand what the fuss is all about.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

It just wasn’t the right Time, Little Marco

March 16, 2016

I am in a series of Posts on Time and thought hard and long whether I may not spoil it by this Post but it had to be said; this is not always the case with Time but I realized that there are times when you have to stick your neck out regardless of the consequences.

Americans of today generally fail the Test of Time because they live in a World of make believe of some past glory that comes from somewhere in the past that they have adopted as their own without even understanding the basics of Time.

Little Marco, oh let me call you Young Marco, you messed around in an adult World.  To come today, from a youngster like you and only a first generation American to boot, to get hammered for your presumptuousness you might have been forgiven, but then to state that “America is a special place; where you come from does not determine where you are going,” heck, young man that is your problem.  Step back Marco, let the people who have been there for twelve generations, proved themselves and paid their dues, yes, let them say that.

Marco, in Russia and China you would not have had a single chance.  Ok, now I can hear you say that you don’t like them.  You also did not like your Fatherland, Marco.

In Africa you would have been fish bait within one hour after announcing your intentions.  Now don’t come telling me that you don’t like Africa either; it’s an old Continent.  The leaders appointed by their forefathers are governing; the rest do as they are told.  It works, I tell you it does.

OK, the colonials introduced a Western form of Government, telling the people they need a Democracy and things almost got out of hand, but the leading families re-introduced the old systems and advised the people that they would  call it Democracy to keep the money flowing from America and to eat MacDonald hot fries.

Bide your time, Marco.  You’ve screwed up and may not get a second chance for a long time.  Pay your dues now and just don’t force things.  Face it Marco, you only got as far as you did, and were allowed to do so by the Party to take the Don out.  You failed, Marco and the DOP [that may be new to you; it’s now spelt with a D for Dead Old Party] will remember; it’s not a Party for brash youngsters in any event.  They only used you as much as they are using Cruz now.

But that’s his problem.  Don’t you go and tarnish your name now by throwing your lot in with Cruz.

Cheerio, sonny-boy; better luck next time.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

Time

March 12, 2016

This matter has been with me for quite a while; an on the spur of the moment I had to decide whether I should say quite a while in the place of quite some time, and made the change.

Time is not only infinite; indeed it is but also much more than that.  Time is the basis and the spine; mortal man has no known definition of Time; we are too small for that; time is immemorial.

Time is the essence of Life; that in turn is a product of Time and the two go together hand and hand never to be separated though, or perhaps I should say because, one created the other and they are therefore, equals in any analysis of one of the two or both at the same time.  Life is, like Time, infinite, forever, both wholesomely rooted in a perfect design that will never end.

No human intervention or any science or discoveries still to come to combine with what we claim that we have already discovered, will ever change or have any influence on Time.  Time is free, everlasting, infinite I have already said, immemorial I have said that too, and will rule and guide us without human interference and the blemishes of human endeavor that are inevitably a part of human nature and was probably intended by Time to be so.

Modern Man is but in its infancy compared to Time and we have existed for a few short moments only when we look at Time.  Let us look at that later; suffices for now we are still infantile in the greater context of time.

Modern Science, to describe it is such because our definitions are lacking, has developed through the eras of the great Greek Philosophers, and some, like modern Sociology have Peer Groups, to guide the younger ones with some clear guidelines to which any new thinking must be submitted for approval, but which often end up in outright rejection by the Peer Group.

So, who is right?  Are the Peers to decide what is true?  What makes them Peers?  In the year of 2016 people like Richard Dawkins would be a Core Peer of the Group but in the time of Socrates he would be a fool and heretic.  Strange thing is that not so long ago in Time he would have perished on the Stake; in the 2016 of today the infantile can rule but in the scales of Time the Peer Groups of yesteryears are being rejected by new realities.

New realities are, of course, all inventions of the 20th century; they have no Peer Group.  “We are free at last” is the hue and cry of the day; there is Space, and that is where our future lies, mankind is about to kick the last remnants of the restricted past into the dust and Rule from Space; no, that’s an understatement; we shall conquer Cyber Pace and rule; indeed we are already in command of Cyber space; hell, they say, you old folks must get with it.

People are standing ready to exit their bedrooms through the mirror in the morning, right on the other side space is waiting and they will walk straight into it through the mirror [a mere press of the button will do it]; out to the office workplace into space they will go; bye for now kids, Daddy will be home tonight.

They will set up new fresh water systems from the moon through all the planets; Mars will be a paradise of Green Peace; Pluto will send clouds when we press the computer button; rain will fall and the sun will shine when we want it to do.  Yes, Oh Yes, Man will take control of his Manifest Destiny.

What did you say?  Did you say or mention God?  Well, don’t do that again.  We are now God.

Until the end of time, they will say,.…, not knowing present mankind will end, well like in tomorrow in time.

But Time will continue.  What is left of last week’s Mankind will pick up the pieces of yesterday and the few weeks of yesteryear and start out on the next Cycle of Time.

To be continued.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

Ikepedia on Super Tuesdays with Super Duper Rubio et al

March 1, 2016

When is America ever to learn?  Will they ever learn?  How can they ever learn that politics are for men?

Putin is a Man, and so is President Xi Jinping of China to mention just two.

How can you guys ever become great again, to quote the Trump, when a failed GOP is using a snot-nosed young kid and still a first generation American baby to assassinate the character of a leading candidate?

You’ve lost it, Grand Old Party, or do you want to hand it to the Hildabeast to finally screw up good and solid the little bit that is still left of America the once Great Society?

If the joker Sharpton gets ready to emigrate, please oh please, I beg you please, don’t let him come down South of your borders.  We have too many of his ilk here already

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

 

Things and time get better with Age

February 28, 2016

I have been spending a lot of time and effort to do something real good on time; something about, for instance, the vagaries and the velocity of time.

It’s been with me for years and when the midnight clock struck 12 last night I knew I had to do it today; leap years, a good measure of time comes only every fourth year and that somehow told me to do it today.

It’s one of those things about time; one has to be there when the moment calls.  I got the call and on the spur of the moment Googled CFA, the initials of an important man in our clan.

There it sat!  Some of the things I have read elsewhere before but never as neat as here.  So some will be oldies to some of you but please do what the author suggests and keep reading until the end.

Lastly then, with compliments and recognition to the author in the link

I enclose the entire contents for your pleasure and convenience.

TIME GETS BETTER WITH AGE

https://www.google.com/search?q=CFA+Vermeulken&gws_rd=ssl

Read it through to the end, it gets better as you go!

I’ve learned that I like my teacher because she cries when we sing Silent Night – Age 5

I’ve learned that our dog doesn’t want to eat my broccoli either – Age 7

I’ve learned that when I wave to people in the country, they stop what they are doing and wave back – Age 9

I’ve learned that just when I get my room the way I like it, Mom makes me clean it up again – Age 12

I’ve learned that if you want to cheer yourself up, you should try cheering someone else up. – Age 14

I’ve learned that although it’s hard to admit it, I’m secretly glad my parents are strict with me. – Age 15

I’ve learned that silent company is often more healing than words of advice. – Age 24

I’ve learned that brushing my child’s hair is one of life’s great pleasures. – Age 26

I’ve learned that wherever I go, the world’s worst drivers have followed me there.- Age 29

I’ve learned that if someone says something unkind about me, I must live so that no one will believe it. – Age 30

I’ve learned that there are people who love you dearly but just don’t know how to show it. – Age 42

I’ve learned that you can make some one’s day by simply sending them a little note. – Age 44

I’ve learned that the greater a person’s sense of guilt, the greater his or her need to cast blame on others.  – Age 46

I’ve learned that children and grandparents are natural allies. – Age 47

I’ve learned that no matter what happens, or how bad it seems today, life does go on, and it will be better tomorrow.- Age 48

I’ve learned that singing “Amazing Grace” can lift my spirits for hours. – Age 49

I’ve learned that motel mattresses are better on the side away from the phone. – Age 50

I’ve learned that you can tell a lot about a man by the way he handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights. – Age 51

I’ve learned that keeping a vegetable garden is worth a medicine cabinet full of pills. – Age 52

I’ve learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you miss them terribly after they die.- Age 53

I’ve learned that making a living is not the same thing as making a life. – Age 58

I’ve learned that if you want to do something positive for your children, work to improve your marriage. – Age 61

I’ve learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance. – Age 62

I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands. You need to be able to throw something back. – Age 64

I’ve learned that if you pursue happiness, it will elude you. But if you focus on your family, the needs of others, your work, meeting new people, and doing the very best you can, happiness will find you. – Age 65

I’ve learned that whenever I decide something with kindness, I usually make the right decision. – Age 66

I’ve learned that everyone can use a prayer.- Age 72

I’ve learned that even when I have pains, I don’t have to be one. – Age 82

I’ve learned that every day you should reach out and touch someone. People love that human touch, holding hands, a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back. – Age 90

I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn. – Age 92

I’ve learned that you should pass this on to someone you care about. Sometimes they just need a little something to make them smile.

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com

The irrelevant Iowa Debate with an update.

January 30, 2016

To Russia, China, Asia and all Sefrikens [and that gives you about all the parts of the World that count], there is nothing to add to the Headline, except maybe …

The Trump won it by the proverbial 1000 miles.  Period.

Oh well, perhaps it is a good idea to read what they say across the pond.  It’s funny in a way, but so are the British and their little Island, not to mention the Guardian jornolosts.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jan/29/republican-race-donald-trump-lose-victory-rivals?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H&utm_term=153879&subid=15255091&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2

Ike Jakson

In Americus GA saka Americoon

ikejakson@gmail.com